At this point late in the year, it is looking increasingly likely that 2022 will be a down year in terms of the number of securities class action lawsuit filings relative both to recent years and even relative to long term historical norms. However, an important (and arguably somewhat surprising) part of the securities suits that were filed this year is the significant number of COVID-related securities suits filed this year. I say “surprising” because it seems unexpected well into the third year that plaintiffs’ lawyers would be continuing to file these suits. In the latest example of these kinds of suits, earlier this week a plaintiff shareholder filed a securities class action lawsuit against the pharmaceutical company Veru, Inc. related to the company’s disclosures concerning its efforts to develop a COVID-related therapy drug. A copy of the December 5, 2022 complaint filed against Veru can be found here.
Continue Reading Drug Development Company Hit With COVID-Related Securities Suit

Regular readers know that in recent months I have been following two securities class action litigation filing trends: first, the incidence of COVID-19-related securities suit filings,  and, second, the influx of claims relating to macroeconomic factors, including, among other things, global supply chain disruption (which was itself caused at least in part by the coronavirus). In a lawsuit that includes allegations that involve both of these trends, a plaintiff shareholder has filed a securities class action lawsuit against the women’s online apparel company, Torrid Holdings, Inc. As discussed below, the complaint alleges, among other things, that in connection with the company’s July 2021 IPO, the company soft-pedaled the impact on the company from COVID-19 and from supply chain disruptions. A copy of the plaintiff’s November 16, 2022 complaint can be found here.
Continue Reading Women’s Apparel Company Hit with COVID and Supply Chain-Related Securities Suit

As I have noted previously (most recently here), there have been a number of COVID-19-related securities class action lawsuits filed since the initial coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. in March 2020. But while these lawsuits have continued to be filed since the outset of the pandemic, as time has gone by, it has become increasingly challenging to say with certainty whether or not a new lawsuit is COVID-19-related. A case in point is the lawsuit filed this week against the online clothing rental and sales platform, Rent the Runway, Inc. (RTR). The lawsuit unquestionably raises allegations related to the challenges that the company faced (and faces) as a result of the pandemic; however, the plaintiff’s complaint raises a number of other allegations as well. For reasons discussed below, and even though the complaint raises a number of different kinds of allegations, I think that on balance the lawsuit counts as COVID-19-related. A copy of the complaint filed against RTR can be found here.
Continue Reading Online Clothing Company Hit With COVID-19-Related Securities Suit

One litigation trend that I have been following on this site since the initial coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. in March 2020 is the incidence of COVID-19-related securities class action litigation. Even though the outbreak is now well into its third year, these coronavirus-related cases continue to be filed. In the latest example of this phenomenon, on November 8, 2022, a plaintiff shareholder filed a securities class action lawsuit against Eiger Biopharmaceuticals in connection with the company’s efforts to develop a COVID-19 treatment. A copy of the plaintiff’s complaint in the case can be found here.
Continue Reading Biopharma Company Hit with COVID-Related Securities Suit

In the current difficult business environment, many businesses face a broad array of daunting business challenges, including economic inflation, rising interest rates, supply chain and labor supply disruptions, the continuing threat of COVID-19 shutdowns, and the war in Ukraine. These various circumstances not only represent potential operational hurdles they may also involve increased litigation risk as well – as I have noted on previous posts (for example, here) these various business challenges can translate into litigation, as well. In the latest example of this phenomenon, earlier this week a plaintiff shareholder launched a securities class action lawsuit against the healthcare apparel firm FIGS, Inc. relating to the increased supply chain costs the company experienced since its June 2021 IPO. A copy of the November 1, 2022 complaint against the company can be found here.
Continue Reading Apparel Company Hit with Supply Chain-Related Securities Lawsuit

As I have noted in numerous posts on this site, since the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in March 2020, plaintiffs’ lawyers have filed a host of coronavirus-related securities class action lawsuits. As I also noted, the plaintiffs’ track record in these cases has been mixed at best, with a number of the cases being dismissed. In the latest example of the hurdles the plaintiffs are facing in these cases, a federal court has entered an order dismissing the COVID-19 related securities suit that was filed against the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca relating to the company’s troubled efforts to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. A copy of the September 12, 2022 opinion in the case can be found here.
Continue Reading AstraZeneca COVID-19-Related Securities Suit Dismissed

Just as the COVID-19 virus continues to represent a threat to human populations, companies continue to explore possible alternatives for the treatment of the disease and its symptoms. As in any initiative built around developing and testing unproven products or processes, a number of these efforts to develop coronavirus treatments and therapies are unsuccessful. In some instances, litigation ensues after these unsuccessful efforts. A lawsuit filed last week against a biopharmaceutical company exemplifies the way this sequence of events can lead to litigation, in turn sustaining the ongoing phenomenon of coronavirus-related securities litigation filings that began at the time of the initial COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. in March 2020.
Continue Reading Biopharma Company Latest to Get Hit With COVID-19-Related Securities Suit

The COVID-19-related securities litigation wave has now been around long enough that companies that were sued early on in the pandemic are now being sued again based on more recent developments. Co-Diagnostics, a diagnostic testing company that was sued in the early months of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. in 2020, has now been sued again in a separate securities class action lawsuit based on the company’s disclosures surrounding its release of its second quarter 2022 financial results. A copy of the new complaint against Co-Diagnostics can be found here.
Continue Reading Diagnostic Testing Company Hit with COVID-19-Related Securities Suit

The changes and disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic continue to roil companies’ business operations and financial results. The pandemic’s effects, and the ensuing shifts in business operations and strategic decision-making, are also in some instances continuing to result in securities class action litigation. In the latest example of these phenomena, a plaintiff shareholder has filed a securities suit against the mental health care service provider LifeStance Health Group, Inc. and certain of its executives. The complaint alleges that the Registration Statement prepared in connection with the company’s June 2021 IPO did not adequately disclose the impact on the company’s operations and finances from the lifting of the government stay-at-home orders and did not disclose the pandemic’s impact on the company’s physician workforce. A copy of the August 8, 2022 complaint against the company can be found here.
Continue Reading Mental Health Services Company Hit with Post-IPO COVID-Related Securities Suit