The advisory shareholder vote required under the Dodd Frank Act went through its first cycle in 2011, and by and large most companies’ shareholders approved the companies’ executive compensation plans. Only about 45 companies (less than 2%) received negative “say on pay” votes from a majority of investors. But that does not mean that the

On May 25, 2011, In the latest example of shareholders suing a company’s board following a negative “say on pay” vote, two union pension funds filed a shareholders’ derivative action claiming that Umpqua Holdings Corporation’s board violated its duties to investor by approving the2010 compensation plan despite the negative shareholder vote.. The lawsuit follows the

One of the many changes introduced by the Dodd-Frank Act was the requirement for a shareholder vote to approve executive compensation. Under the Act’s provisions, the vote is not binding on the company or its board, but is purely advisory. Nevertheless, companies whose shareholders vote against their “Say on Pay” resolutions are finding that lawsuits