The advisory shareholder vote required under the Dodd Frank Act went through its first cycle in 2011, and by and large most companies’ shareholders approved the companies’ executive compensation plans. Only about 45 companies (less than 2%) received negative “say on pay” votes from a majority of investors. But that does not mean that the

For many years, one of the fundamental goals of shareholder rights activists has “proxy access,” which would require corporations to include shareholder nominated board candidates on the company’s proxy ballots. Last year, in the wake of the Dodd-Frank Act, the SEC promulgated rules facilitating shareholder director nominations under certain circumstances. However, on July 22, 2011

On May 25, 2011, In the latest example of shareholders suing a company’s board following a negative “say on pay” vote, two union pension funds filed a shareholders’ derivative action claiming that Umpqua Holdings Corporation’s board violated its duties to investor by approving the2010 compensation plan despite the negative shareholder vote.. The lawsuit follows the

On May 25, 2011, the SEC adopted the final rules implementing the whistleblower provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. The SEC declined to propose a rule that would have required whistleblowers to report first through internal corporate compliance programs. However, the SEC adopted changes that are intended to “incentivize whistleblowers to utilize their companies’ internal

You may have seen May 2, 2011 Wall Street Journal article entitled “Overhaul Grows and Slow” (here), which described the backlog developing as regulators struggle to meet the rule-making deadlines mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act. The article itself was interesting enough, but if you really want to appreciate the daunting task regulators face, you

One of the many changes introduced by the Dodd-Frank Act was the requirement for a shareholder vote to approve executive compensation. Under the Act’s provisions, the vote is not binding on the company or its board, but is purely advisory. Nevertheless, companies whose shareholders vote against their “Say on Pay” resolutions are finding that lawsuits