In prior posts, I have discussed how conflicts of interest in management-led buyouts can give rise to litigation (refer here), and I have examined the ways the recent credit market turmoil is not only undermining leveraged buyouts but also engendering lawsuits (refer here). I have also extensively reviewed options backdating litigation (most recently

As credit market disruption has reached the leveraged buyout world, a number of deals announced earlier this year to great fanfare have been unceremoniously snuffed, while others are on life support. Not too surprisingly, one direct result from this deal derailment has been a spate of lawsuits, as jilted partners and disappointed investors cast blame

As the number of securities fraud lawsuits has declined (refer here), an alternative means that plaintiffs lawyers are finding to amuse and enrich themselves are lawsuits filed in connection with “going private” transactions. An April 24, 2007 National Law Journal article entitled “New Legal Battles Over Going Private” (here) takes a look

The D & O Diary has previously commented (most recently here) on the increasing risk of D & O claims arising from “going private” transactions in which incumbent management teams up with outside investors to buy out the interests of public shareholders. The most recent high-profile “going private” transaction to be announced – the

The Wall Street Journal’s recent series on "Private Money" describes the "new financial order" arising from "the new rules of private equity game." According to the July 25, 2006 Journal article (subscription required) entitled "Cash Machine: In Today’s Buyouts, Payday is Never Far Away," the new power players are private financiers – hedge funds, buyout