In a noteworthy decision that raises a number of interesting issues, District of Minnesota Judge Ann D. Montgomery, applying Minnesota law, held that a company’s excess D&O insurance policy’s prior acts exclusion precludes coverage for the entirety of claims asserted against the company, even with respect to wrongful acts alleged to have taken place after the prior acts date. This case involves a number of twists and turns, while raising some important questions. Judge Montgomery’s June 4, 2019 opinion in the case can be found here. The Wiley Rein law firm’s June 20, 2019 post about the ruling on its Executive Summary Blog can be found here.
Continue Reading D&O Insurance: Prior Acts Exclusion Precludes Coverage for Post-Past Acts Date Conduct

Theoretically, claims made insurance coverage applies to claims made during the policy period regardless of when the underlying acts took place. The claims made arrangement contrasts with the framework under an occurrence policy, where coverage applies according to when the underlying acts took place, regardless of when the claim is made. But even though claims made coverage is intended to apply to claims made during the policy period, there are sometimes claims made policy provisions that can preclude coverage for some or all of the past acts alleged. These coverage limiting provisions can under certain circumstances substantially limit the past acts coverage available under a claims made policy.
Continue Reading Coverage Complications for Prior Acts Under Claims Made Insurance Policies

eleventh circuit1A prior acts exclusion in a bank holding company’s D&O insurance policy precludes coverage for claims based on allegedly fraudulent transfers made to a banking subsidiary during the policy period, because the transfers arose out of wrongful acts that occurred prior to the policy’s past acts date, according to a recent decision by the Eleventh Circuit, applying Florida law. The appellate court reasoned that, though the transfers occurred during the policy period, what made the transfers fraudulent was the company’s insolvency, which arose from officer misconduct that took place prior to the policy’s past acts date. The case provides an interesting example to consider past acts coverage in claims made policies.
Continue Reading Though Fraudulent Transfers Took Place During the Policy Period, Past Acts Exclusion Still Precludes Coverage