scalia
Antonin Scalia

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s death on Saturday has already triggered concerns about the possible outcome of the numerous important cases now pending before the Court, and has further agitated an already tumultuous Presidential election campaign. The furious debate that is already well underway about the nomination of Justice Scalia’s successor could be one of the key issues in the current campaign, and perhaps beyond. While these controversies are likely to continue and to dominate the headlines for some time to come, a different process will also be taking place, and also will likely continue for some time – that is, the debate over Justice Scalia’s legacy.
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tescoIt has been over five years since the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 2010 decision in Morrison v. National Australia Bank restricted the ability of shareholders of non-U.S. companies who purchased their shares outside the U.S. to file securities fraud lawsuit in U.S. courts under the U.S. securities laws. During that five year period, the lower courts have sorted out many of the issues the Morrison decision raises. But one issue continues to percolate – that is, the question of Morrison’s effect on securities suits brought in U.S. court under U.S. law against non-U.S. companies by investors who purchased the companies’ unlisted ADRs over- the-counter in the U.S. The investor lawsuits filed in U.S. court just in the last few days by holders of unlisted Volkswagen ADRs raise this very issue.

The action filed in Southern District of New York in October 2014 by holders of unlisted ADRs of Tesco raise these same issues as well. The parties’ briefing in connection with the defendants’ motion to dismiss in the Tesco case present a detailed examination of the issues involved in the question of the applicability of Morrison to transactions in unlisted ADRs, as discussed below.
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blumarbleAn ever-present anxiety for globally-active non-U.S. companies is the possibility that they might find themselves having to deal with litigation in U.S. courts. This concern is warranted because certain attributes of the U.S. legal system – including the absence of loser pays attorneys’ fee model and the availability of discovery and jury trials – provide

texasThe U.S. Supreme Court’s July 2010 decision in Morrison v. National Australia Bank seemed to sound the death knell for so-called “f-cubed” litigation – that is, lawsuits brought in U.S. courts under the U.S. securities laws by foreign investors who bought their shares in a foreign company on a foreign exchange. However, in an interesting

porscheOn August 16, 2014, in a long-awaited decision that is sure to provoke comment and that could fuel disputes in future cases, the Second Circuit affirmed the dismissal of the securities suits hedge fund purchasers of certain swap agreements had filed against Porsche and its executives.

 

The plaintiffs contended that because they had completed the

In its landmark decision Morrison v National Australia Bank, the U.S. Supreme Court said that the U.S. securities laws do not apply to share transactions that do not take place on U.S. securities exchanges. But do these principles operate the same way in other jurisdiction — would courts in other jurisdictions decline to apply

Since the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Morrison v. National Australia Bank, would-be claimants who purchased shares of a non-U.S. company outside the U.S. have struggled to find a way to pursue their claims in U.S. courts. Among other things, these claimants have tried to avoid Morrison’s federal securities claim-preclusive effect by