Tiago Duarte-Silva
Assen Koev

In order to obtain class certification, the 10b-5 action plaintiff must show that the defendant company’s shares trade in an efficient market. In order for a court to determine whether the company’s shares trade in an efficient market, it must consider the five “Cammer factors,” of which one is whether the company has a sufficient number of analysts following its stock. In the following guest post,  Tiago Duarte-Silva, Vice President, Charles River Associates, and Assen Koev, Principal, Charles River Associates, take a look at this Cammer analyst factor and what it may tell us about 10b-5 actions. A version of this article previously was published by Charles River Associates as a newsletter. I would like to thank Tiago and Assen for allowing me to publish their article as a guest post on this site. I welcome guest post submissions from responsible authors on topics of interest to this blog’s readers. Please contact me directly if you would like to submit a guest post. Here is Tiago’s and Assen’s article.
Continue Reading Guest Post: The Cammer Analyst Factor in Securities Class Actions

A recurring issue in securities cases involves the question of when plaintiffs may rely on the presumption of reliance under the fraud on the market doctrine. To invoke the presumption plaintiffs must show that the defendant company’s securities trade on an efficient market, which in turn raises the question of what the plaintiffs must show in order to demonstrate market efficiency. In the following guest post, attorneys from the Paul Weiss law firm review a recent Second Circuit decision on this issue, Waggoner v. Barclays PLC (here). I would like to thank the attorneys from the Paul Weiss law firm for allowing me to publish this article as a guest post. I welcome guest post submissions from responsible authors on topics of interest to this site’s readers. Please contact me directly if you would like to submit a guest post. Here is the Paul Weiss attorneys’ guest post.
Continue Reading Guest Post: Second Circuit: Price Impact Evidence Not Always Necessary to Establish Market Efficiency

Since the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to revisit the “fraud on the market” theory by granting cert in the Halliburton case a few weeks ago, many commentators (including this blog) have considered whether the Court might wind up taking an intermediate position that addresses criticisms of the theory while preserving securities plaintiffs’ ability to