Nessim Mezrahi
Stephen Sigrist

In the following guest post, Nessim Mezrahi and Stephen Sigrist discuss their analysis of Rule 10b-5 private securities fraud litigation in 2019 and 2020 against U.S. Issuers, and the impact of recent guidance by the 2nd and 7th Circuits on Halliburton II stock price impact defenses at the class certification stage.  Mezrahi is cofounder and CEO and Sigrist is a data scientist at SAR.  SAR’s January 8, 2021 press release discussing a more detailed 4Q 2020 securities class action analysis can be found here. A version of this article previously was published on Law360. I would like to thank Nessim and Stephen for allowing me to publish their article as a guest post on this site. I welcome guest post submissions from responsible authors on topics of interest to this blog’s readers. Please contact me directly if you would like to submit a guest post. Here is the authors’ article.
Continue Reading Guest Post: Halliburton II Price Impact Defenses Can Limit Severity on Deficient Exchange Act Claims

In the same December 11, 2020 Order in which it rejected the bid by the Texas Attorney General to overturn the results of the 2020 Presidential election, the U.S. Supreme Court also agreed to take up a case involving the effort of Goldman Sachs to overturn the certification of a class in the long-running securities lawsuit. The case relates to the bank’s alleged conflicts of interest in structuring collateralized debt obligation securities before the global financial crisis. The case will require the Court to address important questions pertaining to the ability of securities lawsuit defendants opposing class certification to attempt to rebut the presumption of reliance and the extent to which the defendants in opposing class certification can rely on matter that is also relevant to merits-related issues such as materiality.
Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court Agrees to Take Up Securities Suit Class Certification Issues

Since the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to revisit the “fraud on the market” theory by granting cert in the Halliburton case a few weeks ago, many commentators (including this blog) have considered whether the Court might wind up taking an intermediate position that addresses criticisms of the theory while preserving securities plaintiffs’ ability to