One of the important questions about U.S. Department of Justice’s approach following the change of Presidential Administration two years ago was whether DOJ would continue  emphasizing its policy of individual accountability in the agency’s 2015 statement known as the Yates Memo. In a recent speech, Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein announced changes to the policy. The changes, which are more in the form of an adjustment rather than a wholesale change, makes it clear that companies seeking cooperation credit no longer need to identify “all” individuals involved in the wrongdoing, so long as the companies identify those who were “substantially involved” in the misconduct. The text of Rosenstein’s November 29, 2018 speech to the American Conference Institute’s International Conference on the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, at which he announced the changes, can be found here.
Continue Reading Department of Justice Eases “Yates Memo” Requirements for Cooperation Credit

john reed stark
John Reed Stark

A great deal of media attention has been paid to the contents of Anthony Weiner’s laptop computer, including the existence of emails  between or among Hillary Clinton and Huma Abedin. However, questions about the legality of investigative actions taken with respect to the computer have largely been overlooked. In the following guest post, John Reed Stark, President of John Reed Stark Consulting and former Chief of the SEC’s Office of Internet Enforcement, examines these issues as part of a comprehensive review the legal issues pertaining to electronic evidence gathered and sought during criminal and civil investigations. A version of this article originally appeared on CybersecurityDocket. I would like to thank John for his willingness to publish his article as a guest post on my site. I welcome guest post submissions from responsible authors on topics of interest to this blog’s readers. Please contact me directly if you would like to submit a guest post. Here is John’s guest post.
Continue Reading Guest Post: Hidden Lessons from Anthony Weiner’s Laptop (Computer)