U.S. Supreme Court to Decide Whether Item 303 Creates Actionable Disclosure Duty

supreme courtThe U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case that will address a recurring issue that has arisen in the securities class action litigation arena – that is, whether or not the alleged failure to make a disclosure required by Item 303 of Reg. S-K is an actionable omission under Section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5. A circuit split has emerged on this issue, with the Second Circuit holding that Item 303 does create an actionable duty of disclosure, while the Ninth and Third Circuits have held that it does not. The Court’s grant of the writ of certiorari in the case of Leidos, Inc. v. Indiana Public Retirement System will afford the Court an opportunity to resolve the circuit split and to address the question of whether Item 303 creates an actionable disclosure duty. The U.S. Supreme Court’s March 27, 2017 order granting the writ of certiorari can be found here. Continue Reading

Fidelity Bond Rescission Denied Where Application Signatory Was Embezzling Credit Union’s Funds

minnesotaMaterial misrepresentations in an insurance application can serve as the basis for rescission of the resulting policy. A recent federal district court decision examined the question of whether or not an insurer could rescind a fidelity bond on the grounds that the credit union manager who signed the credit union’s insurance application failed to disclose that she was embezzling funds from the credit union. In a March 17, 2017 opinion (here), District of Minnesota Judge Donovan Frank, applying Minnesota law, held that because the manager was acting entirely for her own benefit when she failed to disclose her theft, the misrepresentation could not be imputed to the credit union, and therefore the insurer was not entitled to rescind the bond. Continue Reading

Brazilian Corruption Scandal Spreads to Meat Industry, U.S. Securities Litigation Follows

brazil flagThe massive Brazilian corruption scandal that began with an investigation of the state-owned oil company Petrobras and that has since spread both to other industries, including the construction industry, and to other Latin American countries, has now spread to an investigation of unsanitary practices and corruption in Brazil’s meatpacking industry. Among the Brazilian companies caught up in this latest scandal is JBS S.A., which is the world’s largest meat processing company. As has been the case with other companies caught up in Brazilian corruption scandal, JBS, whose Level 1 ADRs trade over-the-counter in the U.S., has now been hit with a follow-on securities class action lawsuit in the United States. This lawsuit is the latest in the string of lawsuits filed against companies from Brazil and elsewhere Latin America that have been hit with U.S. securities suits following news of their involvement in the burgeoning corruption scandal. Continue Reading

Are New York Courts Keeping the World Safe for Nuisance Value Merger Objection Lawsuits?

new yorkIn a series of decision culminating in Chancellor Bouchard’s January 2016 ruling in the Trulia case (about which refer here), Delaware’s courts have shown their hostility to disclosure-only settlements in merger objection lawsuits. These Delaware developments led some observers to speculate that we might have seen the end of the litigation trend in which nearly every M&A transaction attracted at least one merger objection lawsuit.

 

However, a February 2017 New York court ruling in the Gordon v. Verizon Communications, Inc. (discussed here), in which an intermediate appellate court reversed the lower court’s rejection of a disclosure-only merger objection lawsuit settlement and remanded the case for an award of plaintiffs’ fees, raised the question of whether or not there might yet be life ahead for disclosure-only settlement in merger objection lawsuits.

 

In a provocative March 20, 2017 post on the CLS Blue Sky Blog (here), Columbia Law School Professor John Coffee takes a look at the New York court’s Verizon decision, concluding that the decision ensures that “the nuisance suit remains alive and well in New York and should bring the worst of the plaintiff’s bar streaming back to New York.” Continue Reading

D&O Insurance: Prior and Pending Litigation Exclusion Doesn’t Preclude Coverage, Late Notice Does

connecticutA recent summary judgment ruling in a D&O insurance coverage lawsuit in the District of Connecticut addressed several potentially preclusive coverage issues. In her February 28, 2017 opinion (here), Judge Vanessa Bryant, applying Connecticut law, ultimately held that coverage for the underlying claim was precluded due to the insured’s late provision of notice of claim, a conclusion that under the facts presented arguably is unremarkable. What makes Judge Bryant’s opinion interesting is not her ruling on the notice of claim issue, but rather her analysis of other issues, particularly her conclusion that the “related claim” and “prior or pending litigation” exclusions did not preclude coverage. The facts involved present other seemingly critical issues that Judge Bryant’s decision does not address. Continue Reading

Biotech Companies Sued Frequently But Do They Really Represent a Heightened Risk Class?

test tubesAs has been documented on this blog and elsewhere, life sciences companies in general, and developmental stage biotechnology companies in particular, are frequent securities class action litigation targets. But does that really justify the perception of early stage biotech companies as representing a heightened securities litigation risk class for D&O insurers? A recent law firm paper contends that “contrary to popular belief, development stage biotech companies actually have less to fear from federal securities cases that do many other types of corporate defendants that have a far easier time securing insurance coverage.” Continue Reading

Cornerstone Research: Securities Class Action Settlement Values Increased in 2016

cornerstoneThe number of securities class action settlements as well as the aggregate, average, and median securities class action settlement values all increased in 2016 compared to the prior year, according to the latest annual report from Cornerstone Research. The report, entitled “Securities Class Action Settlements: 2016 Review and Analysis can be found here. Cornerstone Research’s March 15, 2017 press release regarding the report can be found here. Continue Reading

D&O Insurance: Convictions, Appeals, and the Conduct Exclusion

californiaMost D&O insurance policies have conduct exclusions precluding coverage for fraudulent, criminal, or willful misconduct. However, mere allegations are insufficient to trigger this exclusion. If allegations alone were enough, then many claims that would otherwise be covered under the policy would be precluded from coverage, because many D&O claims involve allegations of fraudulent, criminal, or willful misconduct. These days, the conduct exclusions in most D&O policies require a judicial determination in order for the exclusion’s preclusive effect to be triggered. Exactly what is constitutes a sufficient judicial determination is a matter of policy wording. A recent California intermediate appellate court considered a policy that required a “final adjudication” in order for the exclusion to be triggered and determined that the exclusion did not apply to preclude coverage while the insured person’s appeal remained pending, despite the insured person’s criminal securities fraud conviction. The opinion provides an interesting insight into operation of the conduct exclusion with wording of a type found these days in many D&O insurance policies. Continue Reading

How Will the Trump Administration Affect D&O Claims?

white houseA recurring question – one that I am getting now on just about a daily basis – arises from concerns about the Trump administration’s possible impact on the world of directors’ and officers’ liability. Implicit in the question is the assumption that the new administration’s policies and actions will indeed affect D&O claims. While I agree with this assumption – that the new administration’s actions will have an impact–at this point it is still far too early to tell what that impact might be. For now, I think all we can do is watch some key indicators. In this blog post, I review what I think are the key indicators, and what the indicators may tell us about what lies ahead for D&O claims. Continue Reading

The Liability Exposures of Directors and Officers of Pre-IPO Companies

deliveryagentWhen private companies are on track toward a planned IPO, much of the focus and attention is on readying the company for the burdens and responsibilities it will face as a public company. Among other things, this also means a focus on the potential liability exposures for the company and its directors and offices once the company goes public. Until the company actually completes its planned offering, however, it is still a private company — albeit one with a heightened set of risk exposures because of the company’s pre-IPO activities. If the planned IPO never happens, the company and its senior officials sometimes face liability claims arising from pre-IPO activities. A recent complaint filed in the Northern District of California against the former directors and officers of a pre-IPO company that ultimately went bankrupt illustrates the kind of claims pre-IPO companies and their executives can face. Pre-IPO companies’ liability exposures have important implications for the companies’ D&O insurance programs, as discussed below. Continue Reading

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