In the following guest post, Christopher Bannon of the Aronberg Goldgehn law firm takes a look at a recent ruling in which the court addressed the question of whether a lawsuit seeking the return of an administrative fee is a suit for “damages” within the meaning of the applicable insurance policy. A version of this article previously was published as an Aronberg Goldgehn client alert. I would like to thank Chris for allowing me to publish his article as a guest post on this site. I welcome guest post submissions from responsible authors on topics of interest to this site’s readers. Please contact me directly if you would like to submit a guest post. Here is Chris’s guest post.
Continue Reading Guest Post: Restitution of Administrative Fee Does Not Represent Covered Damages

D&O insurance typically defines the term “Claim” to include criminal charges after indictment. However, the coverage available under the policy for criminal proceedings is excluded in the event of a final adjudication determining that precluded misconduct actually took place. But what happens to the coverage if there is no final adjudication but rather the criminal charges are resolved through a negotiation that results in a monetary payment by the criminal defendants? In a recent decision, the Eleventh Circuit determined that the applicable D&O insurance policy’s coverage did not extend to amounts paid in negotiated resolution of criminal charges, despite the absence of a final adjudication – not by operation of the exclusion, but because of the nature of the payments. 
Continue Reading 11th Circ.: Florida Public Policy Precludes Coverage for Voluntary Settlement of Criminal Charges

minnOn December 16, 2014, in an interesting ruling that undoubtedly will stir up a great deal of debate, District of Minnesota Judge Paul Magnuson, applying Delaware law, granted U.S. Bancorp’s motion for summary judgment, holding that the bank’s professional liability insurers must pay $30 million of the $55 million the bank agreed to pay

A settlement of an antitrust lawsuit alleging that a group of hospitals conspired to underpay their nurses did not represent excluded “disgorgement” and therefore was not excluded from coverage under William Beaumont Hospital’s management liability insurance policy, according to a January 16, 2014 Sixth Circuit decision. The opinion will likely be of particular interest to

A recurring question under the management liability insurance protection that banks typically acquire is the extent of the protection afforded under their policies’ professional liability provisions. One particular question that often arises is whether the policy affords coverage for customers’ excessive overdraft fees claims.. An August 7, 2013 decision by Northern District of Georgia Judge

An insurance broker’s settlement of claims for disgorgement of undisclosed contingent commissions does not represent covered loss under a combined lines professional liability insurance policy, according to a December 3, 2010 decision of the Illinois (Cook County) Circuit Court. A copy of the December 3 opinion can be found here.

Background

Aon Corporation