gsMany companies provide advancement, indemnification and insurance benefits and protection for their officers and directors. However, it is not always clear who is an “officer” for purposes of claiming the benefits and protection. The long-running and high-profile saga of Sergey Aleynikov, the former Goldman Sachs computer programmer and company Vice President accused of stealing proprietary

In an October 22, 2013 opinion (here) that underscores the important distinction between indemnification and advancement and that highlights the sometimes surprising extent to which corporate officials are entitled to advancement of their attorneys’ fees when claims are filed against them, District of New Jersey Judge Kevin McNulty held that Goldman Sachs must

In an environment where public company directors and officers face increasing scrutiny and expanding liability exposures, the indemnification and insurance protections available to them are increasingly important. A July 15, 2013 memorandum from the Gibson Dunn law firm entitled “Director and Officer Indemnification and Insurance – Issues for Public Companies to Consider” (here)

An important accessory to the indemnification rights of directors and officers is their right to have their defense expenses advanced while the claims against them are pending, before their ultimate right to indemnification has been determined.  A frequently recurring issue is the question of when the company may withhold advancement. This issue often arises when

In addition to indemnification, corporate directors and officers also may have the right under applicable law and corporate by-laws to have their costs of defense advanced before the ultimate right to indemnification has been determined. A question that often arises is whether a corporation may withhold advancement. A recent decision from the Ontario Superior Court

In the August 2012 issue of Business Law Today, the ABA Business Law Section published an article entitled “Training for Tomorrow: Corporate Counsel Checklist for Supervising Creation/Renewal of D&O Protection Program” (here). The article describes the critical components of a comprehensive executive protection program. A detailed description of the article and an

One of the most important sources of director protection is corporate  indemnification. But as significant as indemnification is for the protection of directors, the directors’ first line of defense, literally, is their right to advancement of their costs of defense. All too often, these two terms – advancement and indemnification – are used interchangeably, but

Indemnification is the first and most important line of defense for the protection of directors and officers. But corporate officials are not always entitled to indemnification. For example, under Delaware law, they cannot claim mandatory indemnification if their defense is not successful. And they cannot seek permissive indemnification is they did not act in good

My primary objective on this blog is to address important developments in with world of directors’ and officers’ liability as they occur. From time to time, however, readers contact me with more fundamental questions about executive liability and protection, particularly regarding the basics of indemnification and D&O insurance. In response to these recurring questions, I

In a June 17, 2009 opinion (here), the Eleventh Circuit upheld the district court’s entry, in connection with the $445 million partial settlement of the HealthSouth securities action, of a bar order that extinguished Richard Scrushy’s contractual claims both for indemnification of any settlement he may enter in the case as well as