The D&O Diary

The D&O Diary

A PERIODIC JOURNAL CONTAINING ITEMS OF INTEREST FROM THE WORLD OF DIRECTORS & OFFICERS LIABILITY, WITH OCCASIONAL COMMENTARY

Tag Archives: Halliburton

Guest Post: Halliburton: Procedures and Percentages Part II—Should We Expect Any Changes Following the Supreme Court’s Ruling?

Posted in Securities Litigation
Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this week in the Halliburton case, questions have continued to swirl about the implications of the court’s decision. In the following guest post, Jennifer Spaziano of the Skadden law firm, takes a look at the impact the Halliburton decision will have on securities class action procedures, outcomes and … Continue Reading

Halliburton: U.S. Supreme Court Declines to Overturn Basic, Allows Defendants to Rebut Presumption of Reliance

Posted in Securities Litigation
On June 23, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court released its long-awaited decision in Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, in which the Court had taken up the question whether or not to set aside the presumption of reliance based on the fraud on the market theory that the Court first recognized in its 1988 … Continue Reading

Guest Post: Halliburton: Procedures and Percentages—Why Did the Court Care and What Do They Mean?

Posted in Securities Litigation
The Halliburton case now before the U.S. Supreme Court could potentially change the securities class action litigation landscape in the United States, as the Court considers whether or not to dump the fraud on the market theory.  However, based upon the oral argument in the case on Wednesday, March 5, 2014, it appears that the … Continue Reading

Arguments to Keep the Fraud on Market Theory, and Thinking About a World Without It

Posted in Securities Litigation
As the March 5, 2014 date for oral argument before the United States Supreme Court in the closely-watched Halliburton case approaches, the briefing process in the case has continued to unfold. On January 29, 2014, the Erica P. John Fund, the respondent (the plaintiff in the underlying action) filed its merits brief in the case, … Continue Reading

Dump “Fraud on the Market” Yet Preserve Securities Plaintiffs’ Ability to Establish Reliance?

Posted in Securities Litigation
Since the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to revisit the “fraud on the market” theory by granting cert in the Halliburton case a few weeks ago, many commentators (including this blog) have considered whether the Court might wind up taking an intermediate position that addresses criticisms of the theory while preserving securities plaintiffs’ ability to try … Continue Reading

Game Changer? The U.S. Supreme Court to Revisit “Fraud on the Market” Presumption

Posted in Securities Litigation
In a development that has the potential to change the way private securities suits in the United States are litigated, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case in which the petitioners seek to have the Court revisit the “fraud on the market” presumption. The presumption allows plaintiffs in securities suits under … Continue Reading

Guest Post: Securities Fraud Class Certification — Supreme Court Oral Argument in the Halliburton Case

Posted in Securities Litigation
I am pleased to reprint below as a guest post a detailed article about the oral argument this past week before the United States Supreme Court in the case of Erica P. John Fund v. Halliburton Co., No. 09-1403. This guest post was submitted by my friend Kimberly M. Melvin. Kim is a partner in the Wiley Rein … Continue Reading